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Posted by / 30-Apr-2020 06:57

Sql updating a table

This is especially true of transactional data and anything to do with dates.

However there are some cases when you need to update master data that is isolated where the easiest way to do this is directly in the SQL table.

Whenever you create an index in SQL Server, it creates a statistic associated with that index. You can’t drop statistics associated with indexes (unless you drop the index). SQL Server does a really good job creating single-column statistics automatically.

Statistics will continue to be created on single columns when queries run as long as the “Auto Create Statistics” database property remains on.

CUSTNMBR = a.customer And here is my data after I run the query above: Even though some of the customers’ terms did not change, it’s sometimes easier to run the update for all the data that you have rather than pick and choose.

Hopefully this example will help you in the future when you need to make updates to your data and the only choice is to do it directly in SQL.

Final warning – updating data directly in SQL Server can have some serious and unintended consequences.

What is more complicated is the following scenario: update the Payment Terms for each customer based on a list in Excel.

If you’re interested in that, head on over and read the fahhhbulous white paper, Statistics Used by the Query Optimizer in SQL Server 2008. Unfortunately, Aristotle was right when it comes to statistics maintenance in SQL Server. This is because you didn’t do any proactive work at all.

Then wait a couple days and chase it with it’s charming cousin, Optimizing Your Query Plans with the SQL Server 2014 Cardinality Estimator. ⇒ If you’re too proactive, you’ll eventually be sorry: If you set up statistics maintenance too aggressively, your maintenance windows can start to run long.

If it shows results, you will need to set up the missing Payment Terms in GP first, before making the changes to the data. Here is my data from before the change: Below is the query I used to update it.

Again, please note that all I am doing is putting parentheses around the data from Excel and adding an alias (a) to it to make it behave as if it’s a table: update RM00101 set PYMTRMID = a.terms from RM00101 r, ( select 'AARONFIT0001' customer, 'Net 30' terms union select 'ADAMPARK0001' customer, 'Net 30' terms union select 'ADVANCED0001' customer, 'Net 15' terms union select 'ADVANCED0002' customer, 'Net 30' terms union select 'ALTONMAN0001' customer, '2% 10/Net 30' terms union select 'AMERICAN0001' customer, 'Net 45' terms ) a where r.

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You can either do that inside the GP application itself, or check the SY03300 table, which is probably more efficient and will also check for any typos: select * from ( select 'AARONFIT0001' customer, 'Net 30' terms union select 'ADAMPARK0001' customer, 'Net 30' terms union select 'ADVANCED0001' customer, 'Net 15' terms union select 'ADVANCED0002' customer, 'Net 30' terms union select 'ALTONMAN0001' customer, '2% 10/Net 30' terms union select 'AMERICAN0001' customer, 'Net 45' terms ) a where terms not in (select PYMTRMID from SY03300) Notice that I simply took what I copied into SQL from Excel and made it into a table by putting parentheses around it and adding an alias (a) at the end.